By R. T. Lahey Jr., D. A. Drew (auth.), Jeffery Lewins, Martin Becker (eds.)

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DREW Equation (74) and Tables I and II yield the following interfacial jump conditions: A. Mass Jump 2 I [..!.. If V a, (x,t) k=l l- o • mil dS] k (75) Using equation (37), equation (75) becomes 2 I rk k=l 0 (76a) That is, r1 + r2 0 (76b) Physically, this means that~or evaporation the mass generation rate per unit volume, r 2. of phase-2 (the vapor phase) is equal to the rate of mass loss per unit volume of phase-l (the liquid phase) • B. Momentum Jump From equation (74) and Tables I and II we obtain: (77) Using Equations (37), (77) as (53) and -

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Cartesian coordinates it can be written as (_g • n ) n + (g. e. the form drag) in a conduit of variable cross section. Thus, if a straight conduit has a constant cross sectional area, + -2. S'" W = o (114) If the phase distribution around the pipe circumference is homogeneous, then from Equation (47), ~~" = ~~" = O. w w If, on the other hand, the flow is stratified and the liquid occupies the bottom portion of the pipe as in Figure 3, we have w J¢ 1 S'" -2. 'IT R2. 0 -¢ e -r R 0 de or S' " -2 w [J¢ 1 'IT R 0 -¢ cose de e + -y J¢ -¢ sine de e 1 -x THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONSERVATION EQUATION Figure 3.

Cartesian coordinates it can be written as (_g • n ) n + (g. e. the form drag) in a conduit of variable cross section. Thus, if a straight conduit has a constant cross sectional area, + -2. S'" W = o (114) If the phase distribution around the pipe circumference is homogeneous, then from Equation (47), ~~" = ~~" = O. w w If, on the other hand, the flow is stratified and the liquid occupies the bottom portion of the pipe as in Figure 3, we have w J¢ 1 S'" -2. 'IT R2. 0 -¢ e -r R 0 de or S' " -2 w [J¢ 1 'IT R 0 -¢ cose de e + -y J¢ -¢ sine de e 1 -x THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONSERVATION EQUATION Figure 3.

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